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  • Timing belt woes.

    removed timing belt without realizing the vvt cams needed to be locked. so they sprang out of time. wondering how I will be able to correct when installing new belt.

  • #2
    If you have no marks at all then you might need the crankshaft lock pin and the camshaft locks and the instruction manual (or the proper procedure) to realign the teeth.
    If the crankshaft and camshafts have not moved then you might risk installing the belt provided the vvt has not moved (a spring version will move by itself).
    Otherwise the crankshaft lock pin is inserted where the starter motor is so it needs to be removed. A great opportunity to service the PCV system as well. If the hoses are hard then they need replacing and the oil separator is good to replace too and verify that the tube under the banjo bolt in the inlet manifold is definitely clear of all obstructions.

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    • Darthvagon
      Darthvagon commented
      Editing a comment
      i already replaced PCV system. was developing a large oil leak from oil pump. so I removed the timing belt to get access. when I removed belt the cam pulleys sprang out of place. so I am assuming the adjusters need to be loaded again before I re-assemble. I will have to get a cam locking tools and figure out how to re-load the VVT. thanks

  • #3
    What motor and year do you have?
    You also need the crankshaft locking pin to correctly locate the crankshaft. If it is not at the right place for setting the timing then you might need to be extremely careful at turning the motor over by hand only and the cams (using the old belt) so that any piston - valve interference will not cause damage.
    if the front crankshaft seal was leaking and you replaced the oil pump front seal, o-ring and gasket then the camshaft seals are possibly in a p
    oor state and the rear crankshaft seal too. Unless it is from a blocked PCV system.

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    • Darthvagon
      Darthvagon commented
      Editing a comment
      it's a 2005 XC70 2.5 turbo motor. everything was lined up before I removed the belt. So assuming cams and crank should be close. Cam pulleys sprung when belt was removed. Now the cam pulleys spin free left and right but stop after and inch or so. PCV was blocked previously most oil seems to be coming from pump area.

  • #4
    A blocked PCV or even restricted will cause higher internal pressures and cause oil leaks and possibly push the seal out. I had one cam seal come out partially with the associated oil outside but the PCV was in very good order. The seals were just old and the front crankshaft seal was about to fail with small cracks in the surface. The oil pump gasket was also brittle and deformed possibly allowing some blow by.
    I have access to setting the timing belt for 2.4 motor but not the 2.5. It is possibly the same. Different from the typical videos though.
    If you are getting the timing belt equipment (cam locks crankshaft locator stop) then l would suggest a tension wrench and the Torx for the cam front bolt and replace the cam seals and the crank seal. Check the back crankshaft seal if it is showing signs of wetness (a misery job to get at if it fails).

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    • #5
      Here is a link to some timing marks

      https://volvoforums.com/forum/2001-2...-change-85970/

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      • #6
        I hope the timing marks get sorted. I just did this job, replacing the PCV box, ending up replacing all the fuel injectors, along with the planned replacement of the timing belt, water pump, belt rollers, and the serpentine belt on our 2001 s60 (base). It had a horribly clogged PCV box, so that was a good thing to replace. When I did the timing belt, on what turned out to be bad advice from the inter web, I attempted to leave the crankshaft pulley on, thinking the new timing belt could be slipped behind. Nope, no way, and then I realized the risk I was taking as moving the crankshaft pulley could very easily move the pistons away from TDC, and maybe mush a valve. Happily, motion was minimal, so used an impact driver to remove the pulley, as I should have done. After that, everything went well.
        Fixing up a 1989 740 GLE sedan, keeping a 1990 240 DL and a 2001 s60 going...

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