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  • Rumble noise

    I have a 2004 P2 V70, 2.5t with a problem that is driving me nuts. I bought the car last February and found and fixed one or two issues since then, but I have one that refuses to be identified. There is a what can only be described as a wuump wuump noise which I think is coming from the front. It doesn't change it's low pitch with road speed and only goes faster with road speed not engine speed.

    It seems it could be connected to the wheel circumference rather than the axles, and I first thought that it was the wheel hub/bearings, and even though it didn't sound like a bearing failure (I've had one on another car) I changed them out, and the ones I took off were perfectly smooth. Yeah I know..But as they're once only bolts taking them off would need changing the bolts again anyway.

    Needless to say the sound hasn't gone away. It's there with smooth or uneven road surfaces but worse with a bad surface. I've just been underneath to check the axles and suspension and mounts. All seem good and in fact some of the suspension components and rhs axle look new and may have been changed by previous owner. No play in that at all, and the lhs one has minimal play along it's length and neither axle has any rotational play. CV joints are good and all gaiters are clean and sealed (No splits).

    I'm keen to find out what this is. I haven't yet looked at the rear hubs but I guess that's next to look at though it seems to be coming from the front. Any help is gratefully received.

    Old Volvos don't die, they just accumulate receipts. 😀

  • #2
    Could also be the differential bearings or other internal stuff
    ASE Certified Mechanic
    Journeyman Body & Frame Repair Technician
    855 Turbo ALMOST "R"
    V70R
    C55 AMG
    Grey market Brabus
    BMW 540 touring
    BMW 525 touring
    BMW 325 touring
    Lotus Esprit. settle down, it's a 77 S1
    LOOKING FOR AN E30 WAGON

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    • #3
      I forgot to mention, when I had the car looked at before I bought it (Needed a new radiator) the mechanic told me the transmission was new, I asked him how he knew and he said there were giveaways (I later found out the click from the steering wheel was a displaced collar and probably caused by a bracket at the bottom of the column not being taken off properly or something causing the click). Anyway, that was at 139000 miles I've just tripped 145000. Wouldn't the diff bearings speed up and slow down in different gears? I've driven along and shifted it to 4th and even 3rd from 5th and the speed of the noise remains the same.
      Old Volvos don't die, they just accumulate receipts. 😀

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      • #4
        "New" is a strange word. New to one person can be entirely different to someone else but regardless, if it's a rotating sound then it would have to change pitch etc as every rotating part changes speed. So Idk. Armchair sound diagnosis is a tough one
        ASE Certified Mechanic
        Journeyman Body & Frame Repair Technician
        855 Turbo ALMOST "R"
        V70R
        C55 AMG
        Grey market Brabus
        BMW 540 touring
        BMW 525 touring
        BMW 325 touring
        Lotus Esprit. settle down, it's a 77 S1
        LOOKING FOR AN E30 WAGON

        Comment


        • #5
          I agree and I appreciate your input. This morning as a long shot I swapped the wheels front-rear to see if the noise moved. A quick drive wasn't conclusive, going for a longer drive later.
          Old Volvos don't die, they just accumulate receipts. 😀

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          • #6
            How much rotational play should there be on the axles? Zero? about a millimeter read on the axle surface? More? I've googled but can't find an answer, just general comments about noise, CV clicking and how to change the axles.

            I had another look this morning and the carrier bearing looked as if the outer race was turning in the bracket. I checked the torque setting and it checked out. Took out the two bolts, took off the clamp and realised the outer race isn't turning I had been looking at the outer edge of the sealing ring, the outer race was static. Anyway as the clamp was off I checked again the play and naturally it was considerably more this time, both left and right. Put the clamp back on and torqued to spec and the play was the same as before clamp removal.

            My question is, how can I narrow the play down to the axles or the internals of the transmission before spending any money on new axles which at a pinch I could probably do myself event though I don't have a hoist to lift up the car.
            Old Volvos don't die, they just accumulate receipts. 😀

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            • #7
              Sorry if I missed it mentioned already, and it might be a stupid suggestion, but maybe a brake dust shield or something rubbing?
              2001 V70 T5 - current
              1996 850 GLT - given away
              2002 V70XC - sold
              1986 740 GLE - scrapped

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              • #8
                I looked at the shields and they're clear. I checked them again when I swapped out the hub bearings. If you're familiar the sound is similar to the off beat of a flat four engine, such as a Subaru. It doesn't get louder with speed, the pitch doesn't rise to a squeal, it just stays the same but faster. I have noticed when decelerating and finally putting on the brakes it sounds slightly louder but not significantly. I'm tossing it up between one or both axles (CV joints are fine-I'm suspecting the other end) or something internal in the transmission, but obviously I don't want to throw money at it and miss the target-again!

                And as one of my favourite school teachers used to like saying, the only stupid question is the one not asked.
                Old Volvos don't die, they just accumulate receipts. 😀

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